Yellow spots in the eye

Drusen are tiny yellow deposits in a layer of the retina called Bruchs membrane. They are the most common early sign of dry macular degeneration.

Drusen are made up of lipids, a type of fatty protein, which may be the result of a failure of the eye to dispose of waste products properly.

There are several types of drusen with different levels of risk. Drusen can be small, hard and scattered far apart from each other. They are round and distinct.   Often, vision is not affected.   However, when the drusen are larger, softer, & closer together,  there is a greater risk for developing wet macular degeneration.   This results in much more severe vision loss and requires intervention to save your eyesight.

Drusen are visible on a dilated eye examination.

 

“Can Glasses Help Me?”

CNVMUnfortunately, my answer to this patient was “no.”   This is wet macular degeneration that I had to send for Avastin treatment by a retinal specialist.

There are two basic types of macular degeneration: “wet” and “dry.” Approximately 10-15% of the cases of macular degeneration are the “wet” (exudative) type.

In the “wet” type of macular degeneration, abnormal blood vessels (known as choroidal neovascularization or CNV) grow under the retina and macula. These new blood vessels may then bleed and leak fluid, causing the macula to bulge or lift up from its normally flat position, thus distorting or destroying central vision. Under these circumstances, vision loss may be rapid and severe.